Jindal’s unimaginative record as governor won’t get him to the White House

Bobby Jindal

Gov. Bobby Jindal (Photo credit: Gage Skidmore)

By Robert Mann

Now that he no longer chairs the Republican Governors Association, Gov. Bobby Jindal needs a new organization to undergird his White House quest and a new vehicle for his out-of-state travels. That entity is “America Next,” ostensibly an idea factory for frustrated conservatives, but really a front for Jindal’s budding presidential campaign.

“If we believe in the principles we espouse, then we should have no fear of putting them into practice, and we should have no fear of articulating for the American people exactly what a conservative policy agenda will do,” Jindal writes on the organization’s Spartan website.

Almost as interesting as its stated purpose is the new organization’s name, one that suggests it’s time to bless the rest of the nation with Jindal’s leadership and vision. The group hasn’t yet proposed a single policy innovation, so it’s not clear exactly what specific programs Jindal will tout.

However, selling his vision to the nation may be a challenge. That’s partly because the policy-cautious Jindal really hasn’t revealed much vision unless, by “vision,” one means serving up warmed-over, off-the-shelf conservative ideas. As for leadership, his modest job approval ratings provide no evidence of a deep well of affection or enthusiastic support at home.

The problem is that whatever ideas Jindal ultimately champions will emerge near the end of his tenure as governor. Republican primary voters and the news media would be justified in asking, “If your ideas are so new and compelling, why didn’t you try them in Louisiana?”

Continue reading at NOLA.com

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2 Responses to Jindal’s unimaginative record as governor won’t get him to the White House

  1. Stephen Winham says:

    “Republican primary voters and the news media would be justified in asking, “If your ideas are so new and compelling, why didn’t you try them in Louisiana?””

    This one sentence says it all, but the immediate question should be: Why haven’t they been justified in asking that question long before now and why aren’t they asking it even now?

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  2. Pingback: Something Like the Truth | On Medicaid expansion, Jindal should embrace his own plan

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