Politico: David Vitter “one of the most disliked members” of the U.S. Senate

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By Robert Mann

News flash: Sen. David Vitter is not among the most popular members of the U.S. Senate. In fact, according to a new story in Politico,

Within the chummy confines of the U.S. Senate, Vitter has emerged as one of the most disliked members. The second-term senator’s effort to kill the federal health care contribution, worth several thousand dollars to lawmakers and their staffers, is a big part of it. But the two-year drive, his critics say, symbolizes an operating style that Vitter’s critics complain is consumed with public relations, even for an ambitious member of Congress: speeding in and out of meetings, railing about issues on the Senate floor but doing little to execute behind the scenes, firing off news releases left and right. In an institution in which the inside game is critical, Vitter doesn’t even pretend to bother with it.

Politico says “the most recent repudiation of Vitter . . . came a month ago in the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, which he chairs. He tried to subpoena documents to investigate how members of Congress and their aides became eligible for health care under Obamacare’s D.C. exchange.

“Five Republicans — including presidential candidate Rand Paul — blocked the request, angering Vitter and prompting an unusual round of second-guessing from GOP committee members over their chairman’s agenda.”

The bottom line of the story, which won’t surprise anyone who has worked with or closely observed Vitter over the years, is that he is a self-righteous, self-serving political animal who has few allies and even fewer friends in the Senate.

Vitter, 54, a Rhodes scholar who earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard, is one of the more conservative members of the Senate GOP Conference. But his personal style — an unusual combination of brashness and standoffishness that dates to his time in the Louisiana statehouse two decades ago — has long annoyed many of his cohorts.

“He doesn’t really like to talk to members,” one GOP senator who asked not to be named said of Vitter, who also does not engage with reporters in the halls of the Capitol.

Read the entire story at this link.

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8 Responses to Politico: David Vitter “one of the most disliked members” of the U.S. Senate

  1. Montague, Susan says:

    Who knew?? Hahahahahaha

    Sent from my iPhone

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  2. Diane says:

    is that the guy that hired a hooker and wore a diaper?

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  3. Chris says:

    He has a weasel complex about him. Tough talker with no action. And if you’ve ever shook his hand, you’d experience quite the weak, feminine paw. I sure hope the people of Louisiana do not elect him to governor like I think they will.

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  4. Stephen Winham says:

    Vitter and Jindal have more things in common than most of us realize at first blush because their differences overshadow them. Most prominent among their similarities are very high IQs. Unfortunately, rigid personal ideologies often severely restrict the effective use of these intellectual gifts, .

    The POLITICO article contains this passage related to Vitter’s handling of the apparent main bone of contention between him and his colleagues: “… [it] symbolizes an operating style that Vitter’s critics complain is consumed with public relations, even for an ambitious member of Congress: speeding in and out of meetings, railing about issues on the Senate floor but doing little to execute behind the scenes, firing off news releases left and right.” – now I ask you, who does this sound like?

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Michael Wade says:

    I don’t really know what else there is to choose from, but Diaper Dandy Vitter will be nothing but more grief for Louisiana. He’s one of those pretty little boys without substance who abound in American politics; the interior is much less attractive. Let him stay in the Senate until his term is up, then vote him out of that too.
    Now, I will admit that Governor Pampers would make for an even better humorist fodder than the current laughingstock, but that’s hardly a reason to keep digging Louisiana’s people ever deeper into the mire.

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  6. earthmother says:

    Michael Wade: 1. Choose John Bel Edwards. 2. Vitter is not a pretty little boy. He’s a grown man, unattractive inside and out, just like the current (pretend) governor. I’m afraid Mr. Winham is absolutely correct in his observation that vitter and jindal share many ugly personality traits. They are practically interchangeable.

    Instead of resigning ourselves to the inevitability of another disastrous incumbent of the fourth floor, it’s up to us to work to convince voters to stop spittin’ in the wind, actually get out and vote – AND vote intelligently.

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    • Michael Wade says:

      While I mostly agree with you, including on gubernatorial candidates, I do think that Vitter has gotten by mostly on his looks and a phonied-up public persona. The reason so many Senators don’t like him is that
      they see the ego, the pandering and the naked ambition, all of which is doubly obnoxious when it comes from a largely empty suit. All hat and no cow, not unlike Eduardo Cruz, who is even less liked by his colleagues. Couldn’t agree with you more about the need for Louisianians to vote their own interests for a change, including especially the legislative races. A sincere good luck with that effort.

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