Jindal and Vitter were adversaries to the bitter end

By Robert Mann

They can barely stand the sight of one another. They have never been political allies. Sometimes, it seemed Louisiana was too small for their outsized egos and ambitions.

How ironic, then, that the political careers of Gov. Bobby Jindal and U.S. Sen. David Vitter should come to abrupt and humiliating conclusions in the same week, only four days apart.

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U.S. Sen. David Vitter

After spending his five-month official campaign stuck at 2 percent or less in the national polls, Jindal bowed to reality and left the race on Tuesday, Nov. 17. By 10 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 21, Vitter had not only lost the governor’s race to state Rep. John Bel Edwards, he also announced he would not seek re-election to the Senate.

The political aspirations of the two Republicans who had ruled Louisiana politics for much of the past decade were suddenly, just days apart, reduced to ashes.

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Gov. Bobby Jindal

While neither man was primarily responsible for the other’s political demise, they had done nothing to help each other in their respective political pursuits.

For anyone hoping to undermine Jindal in places like Iowa, New Hampshire or South Carolina, there were plenty of quotes available of Vitter denigrating Jindal’s leadership.

As for Jindal, the fiscal calamity that was his governorship added to the political headwind facing Vitter. While Republicans did well in the state’s Nov. 21 elections, the most important Republican on the ballot – Vitter – went down hard. And it was a defeat partly attributable to disgust with Jindal.

Even as they left the scene, the two men could not resist jabbing each other.

As Jindal ended his presidential campaign, it was immediately assumed that he had chosen the date to undermine any last-minute surge by Vitter. Right at the moment Vitter appeared to find an issue to lure Republicans back to his side – fear over Syrian refugees in Louisiana – Jindal pushed Vitter off the front pages. If Vitter had any momentum going – and it’s not clear that he did – Jindal’s announcement ended it.

He certainly wasn’t sorry to see Jindal drop out of the presidential race, but you can bet Vitter wished Jindal had waited until Sunday, Nov. 22, to announce his decision. Would holding off five more days have killed Jindal?

Continue reading on NOLA.com at this link.

 

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This entry was posted in Bobby Jindal, David Vitter, John Bel Edwards, Louisiana governor's race, Louisiana Politics, Politics, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Jindal and Vitter were adversaries to the bitter end

  1. Stephen Winham says:

    Vitter and Jindal each proved what was most important to them – Vitter to VItter, Jindal to Jindal, and Louisiana to neither.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. gjrushing says:

    No, most voters, Republicans and Democrats alike had simply had enough of David Vitter. His ads filled with lies proved to a lot of voters they were correct in believing David Vitter is without ethics and believes he is above the law. He broke the law and he has never been called to task for it. He was asking voters to believe what he did was just a “sin” and he had been forgiven by his wife so the rest of use should just forget that what he did was actually a crime and certainly a serious ethics violation. He was shielded by the party, to avoid Gov Blanco appointing a Democrat to fill his seat, and was re-elected, so he believed he had avoided any serious consequences and was indeed above the law. His chickens have come home to roost, so the old saying goes. He needs to consider himself lucky that he has not lost his legal license for committing the crime of prostitution. His Wiki bio says he admitted to it, but I have no recollection of him ever admitting to anything other than a “sin”. Most of us were never concerned about his so called sin. It’s the fact that he broke the law and has never been called to account for it that bothers me the most. Certainly he has not paid the same price for violating the law or even lesser offenses, as many others have. Good riddance and hopefully this state can move on to better days, for everyone and not just the elite.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Louis Sparks says:

    Let’s hope we don’t see the Jindal / Vitter brand of anti-people / pro-corporations politics again.

    Like

  4. Jindal has a future in a neoconservative think tank with the neocon cohort that hails from and self-describes as evangelical catholicism.

    These folks are infernal pessimists re: BIG GOVT’s role in the board room and economic affairs, but eternal optimists in the war room re: installing Jeffersonian democracies 10,000 miles away in tribalistic cultures. They called their strategy “democratization through destabilization.” How’s that been working for ya lately? They’ll also install BIG GOVT in the bedroom. At least the libertarians are consistent, resisting statist tendencies across the board (to a fault, misinterpreting subsidiarity).

    Religiously, they’re eternal optimists regarding the grace available to follow magisterial moral dictates, but infernal pessimists when it comes to believing that same grace can inform individual consciences re: moral realities in the first place.

    They have, then, a pax americana doctrine re: military intervention, a pax romana re: pelvic christianity and a pox upon all tax re: market realities. Its militant, triumphalistic, filled with epistemic hubris. They have a definite pneumatological optimism re grace lighting their path, but a pessimism re its presence in our cultures, home or abroad, which ain’t very catholic or incarnational.

    Like

  5. lambruscoemilia says:

    Jindal has a future in a neoconservative think tank with the neocon cohort that hails from and self-describes as evangelical catholicism.

    These folks are infernal pessimists re: BIG GOVT’s role in the board room and economic affairs, but eternal optimists in the war room re: installing Jeffersonian democracies 10,000 miles away in tribalistic cultures. They called their strategy “democratization through destabilization.” How’s that been working for ya lately? They’ll also install BIG GOVT in the bedroom. At least the libertarians are consistent, resisting statist tendencies across the board (to a fault, misinterpreting subsidiarity).

    Religiously, they’re eternal optimists regarding the grace available to follow magisterial moral dictates, but infernal pessimists when it comes to believing that same grace can inform individual consciences re: moral realities in the first place.

    They have, then, a pax americana doctrine re: military intervention, a pax romana re: pelvic christianity and a pox upon all tax re: market realities. Its militant, triumphalistic, filled with epistemic hubris. They have a definite pneumatological optimism re grace lighting their path, but a pessimism re its presence in our cultures, home or abroad, which ain’t very catholic or incarnational.

    Like

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